Humanities and Media Studies Electives – Spring 2020


HMS 203B – World Literature Survey II             Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01 – Steven Doloff, ENGR 307; MW (11 AM–12:20 PM)
3 credits

This course investigates major literary works of poetry, prose, and drama from around the world from the 17th Century to the present. These works are examined within their specific literary and historical contexts.                                                           

HMS 225A – Intro to Journalism              Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01 – TBA, NH 116; Th (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

This course teaches basic techniques of journalism, including research, interviewing, fact-checking and ethics—all in the context of readings in the history of journalism and under the guidance of an experienced professional. Students research and write basic news stories and profiles and generate story ideas, with encouragement to pursue suitable outlets for publication. Classroom instruction and writing assignments are supplemented with field trips and guest lectures from professional journalists. 

HMS 261A – Intro to Public Speaking                 
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Adeena Karasick, ENGR 307; W (2–4:50 PM)

02—Professor Melissa Milgrom, Manhattan PMC 403; MW (5–6:20 PM)
SECTION 02 RESTRICTED TO CM STUDENTS

50—Professor Melissa Milgrom, Manhattan PMC 312; W (10 AM–12:50 PM)

3 credits

This course is an introduction to effective public speaking as well as effective communication in small groups. All students will develop, organize, and deliver several types of speeches; study in workshop form the dynamics of various interpersonal communication situations, such as conflict management, job interviews, body language, and cross-cultural exchanges; and improve critiquing and listening skills. Students will complete research papers and lead mini-workshops about further aspects of interpersonal communication.         

HMS 262A – Intro to Acting          
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Don Andreasen; M (9–11:50 AM)
3 credits

The essential element desired in acting is to be truthful, to be believable. This course will develop in the actor the ability to be genuine, to listen and respond in the moment. The goal of the class is to develop fundamental acting skills including: voice, movement, expression, imagination, character development, trust and relaxation. tudents will perform memorized scenes and monologues. Additionally, we will work towards knowledge and growth in the Stanislavski and Meisner systems.

HMS 300A – Children’s Literature          
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Kathryn Cullen-DuPont, ENGR 305; MW (5–6:20 PM)  
3 credits                                                                                                                    

This is a (selective) survey of 300 years of books written for children, with particular emphasis on the idea of childhood as implicit in the texts and (sometimes) explicit in the illustrations.  Students may approach the course as critics or (potential) creators – writers/illustrators.

HMS 301B – Modernist Drama                
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Steven Doloff, ENGR 307; M (2–4:50 PM)          
3 credits

This course examines a sampling of works by modernist playwrights such as Ibsen, Shaw, Brecht, Chekhov, O'Neill and Beckett to explore how contemporary drama has been and continues to be informed by the ideas of these 19th and 20th Century innovators of the theater. A term paper is required.

HMS 305A – New Wave Deafness in the Arts              

Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Diane Cohen, NH 108; T (9–11:50 AM)  
3 credits

From an outsider perspective, the non-Deaf community tends to define deafness by the absence of hearing. Broadening our view to include how members of the Deaf community view their experiences, we will familiarize ourselves with disability theory in order to enter a discourse about what role our societal perspectives play in negotiating the line between disability and culture. Based on our understanding of the subjective nature of disability and considering deafness as a culture having departed from disabled origins, we will explore the ways in which Deaf artists, writers, filmmakers, comedians and architects have contributed to mainstream culture and the role their cultural identity plays in their works. We will read academic texts on disability theory, explorative works on deafness, first hand accounts of the Deaf experience as well as observe the cross-genre intertextuality of Deaf expression.

HMS 308A –  Shakespeare            
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Steven Doloff, ENGR 307; M (5–7:50 PM)          
3 credits

Students analyze and interpret representative Shakespearean plays as works of dramatic art and as reflections of the Renaissance climate. A research project is required of those who opt for three credits.

HMS 311B – Detective Fiction    
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Paul Haacke, ENGR 305; W (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

This course will investigate forms of detective fiction—and discourses of mystery and crime more broadly—in literature, cinema and other media. We will rethink their development form the post-Enlightenment urbanization of the gothic in the nineteenth century to the rise of whodunit mysteries and hard-boiled crime fiction in the twentieth century (including connections to other genres like the psychological thriller, western and science fiction), as well as film noir, neo-noir, and more experimental, postmodern and contemporary examples from across nations and cultures. Our critical and theoretical inquiries will consider how stories of criminal transgression and forensic fact-finding relate to historical transformations of subjectivity and society, and how they pose challenging questions about truth, justice and power that persist to this day.                                                                                   

HMS 320C – Screenwriting II      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Don Andreasen, ENGR 113; W (9–11:50 AM)    
3 credits

This course continues Screenwriting I in further developing the use of setting, location, narrative structure, conflict, character development and dialogue. In the first half of the course, students write short scenes. In the second half, they work on scripts for a 10-15 minute film.

HMS 320D – Screenwriting I
(all sections restricted to DDA students)

02—Professor Cecilia Dougherty, NH 106; F (9:30 AM–12:20 PM)
03—Professor Cecilia Dougherty, NH 106; F (2–4:50 PM)
04—Professor Mateo Sancho Caridel, NH 107; F (9:30 AM–12:20 PM) 
3 credits

This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of screenwriting. Topics covered include formatting, setting, location, narrative structure, conflict, character development and dialogue. In the first half of the course, students write their own short scenes. In the second half, they develop and expand those scenes into a script for a 10-15 minute short film.

HMS 320S – Creative Writing      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Robert Lopez, MAIN 302; W (5:30–8:20 PM)          
3 credits

This course is an exploration of imaginative composition through analysis of passages from selected authors and regular creative writing.

HMS 320S – Turning Life into Memoir/Fiction           
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

02—Professor Dexter Jeffries, ENGR 305; M (6:30–9:20 PM)         
3 credits

Memoir comes from the Latin word memoria which means memory.  This class will use many different techniques at sharpening your memory and then harvesting that material into finished autobiographical pieces.  By looking at family photographs, making time lines of landmark personal events and listening to music and voices from your past, you will build the confidence that the stories are already there, in your head, in your memory.  Good autobiographical writing is the burning desire to tell a story where you refuse to make changes that would make the story better.  The memoir writer’s piece stands on its own.  By the end of this semester you will possess a manuscript that illuminates a new awareness of who you were, are, and hints at who you may become in the near or distant future.  

HMS 331S – The Digital Body       
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Shayla Lawz, NH 108; T (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

“I saw a phone the other day and she looked just like you.” When we say “digital body” we can imagine a number of permutations, shapes, and openings. As the extended mind thesis says, our devices are—to the degree that they hold some of our most important memories—extensions of ourselves. Accepting this, one might ask, what does that make ME? What does this say for my living body? And ultimately, if our devices are extensions of ourselves, are we extensions of our devices? Are we kindred to the telephone, the radio, the television?

In this course we will explore how artists across disciplines are working at the intersection of text, performance and (social) media to expand our ideas about the human body. We will look at how activist movements like Black Lives Matter, that began in a digital space, have extended to the physical body—the protest body—to transmit images. We will look to poets who use their bodies to challenge where the body ends and begins. We will look at performance artists who extend the digital from their bodies in the performance space and, in this act, bring the digital to life.

We will use this work as a guide to produce our own creative work and investigate how life is made through the body, how death is archived, and how the dead are memorialized in our living beings. We will do this all with the intention of understanding how we reconcile the body in the digital age. Perhaps most importantly, we will consider this question: if we are comprised of both human matter and media—a series of flesh, photographs, images, and sometimes just a dial-tone on the other end—how do we recognize one another? How do we act as witness? Is picking up the telephone an act of seeing? Who will answer you in your time of need and what does this all mean for our aliveness?

HMS 332S – Feminist Media Theory      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Jon Beller, Dek 010, Th (2:00 PM – 4:50 PM)
3 credits

This seminar examines media theory and various media platforms including Print/Language, Photography, Film, Television, Radio, Digital Video, Surveillance Technologies and Computing as treated by feminists, critical race and queer theorists, and other scholars and artists working from the purported margins of a self-presumed global center characterized by capitalist patriarchy and White supremacist ideologies. While media theory is a recently emerged and rapidly growing field, conventional (masculinist, Euro-American-centric) approaches, often assume the universal relevance of their claims, and threaten to define and overwhelm a diversity of critical endeavors that self-consciously hail from specific communities and locales. Eschewing universalism by provincializing it, we thus attend carefully to the specificities of embodiment, historical location and media platform in our studies.

HMS 360D – Intro to Performance Studies      

Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Julia Steinmetz, Dek 010; T (9–11:50 AM)
3 credits

In this course, students will learn the fundamental concepts, terms, and theories in the field of performance studies. Students will learn how to use these frameworks to understand traditional performance arts as well as gain unique perspectives on their own major fields, on other art/design practices, and on everyday life, by learning to see the world performatively. This class is required for the Performance and Performance Studies Minor but open to non-minors as well.

HMS-390S – Rebel Music              
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Jayna Brown, NH 307; T (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits

Music is a medium through which artists and audiences have historically voiced critical defiance of systems and societies, and played an elemental part of inciting civil disobedience. Its meaning is intimately intertwined with performance and audience participation. This class focuses on popular forms of ‘rebel music,’ as Bob Marley called it, including jazz, blues, ska, dub, punk, reggae and rap. We will listen, dance, and view documentaries, asking the questions: how does music form communities? What does listening mean? How does location (club/headphones) shape the music’s affective register? What happens when a musical form hits the market? Can it still be the sound of resistance? Open to graduate and undergraduate students.

HMS 404D – Girl in American Lit/Art
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Maria Damon, Dek 010; T (5–7:50 PM)  
3 credits

During the nineteenth and early twentieth century, representations of girls proliferated in American literature and visual culture. The American girl became a crucial image for creating feelings of familial, racial, and national belonging. This course will ask why American girls became such a focus, look into the cultural and historical forces converging to make them figures for the nation’s preoccupations, and examine how representations of girls became so laden with meaning. This course is informed by a variety of disciplines, including art history, as well as studies of gender, literature, and American culture. Along the way, we will become familiar with feminist work that analyzes how images of the gendered body regulate who can visibly and actively participate in the nation.

HMS 404E – Photography & American Lit
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Seth Watter, NH 207; M (2–4:50 PM)     
3 credits

This course will investigate the impact photography has had on American literature and culture. Examining a variety of literary, visual, and cultural texts from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present, we will focus on the role photography has played in the construction of race, gender and contestations over American citizenship.

HMS 410S – Whitman, Dickinson & Co.
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

02—Professor Ellen Levy, ENGR 113; W (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits

In-depth study of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman and their poetic afterlife in the work of such 20th century writers as Hart Crane, Allen Ginsberg, Susan Howe, D.H. Lawrence, Federico Garcia Lorca, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, and Jack Spicer. 

HMS 430D – Psychoanalysis and Art                
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Suzanne Verderber, ENGR 115; Th (9–11:50 AM)
02 – Professor Suzanne Verderber, MAIN 301; W (9–11:50 AM)

3 credits                                                        

This course examines the relationship between psychoanalysis and art from different perspectives, including the centrality of art and language to the development of psychoanalytic theory and the integration of psychoanalytic theory into the cultural critique of art, literature, and cinema. The course will provide an introduction not only to major psychoanalytic theories, including those of Freud, Jung, and Lacan, but will demonstrate the myriad and complex ways psychoanalysis has become inextricable from contemporary art criticism and theory.

HMS 430S – Postcoloniality and Aesthetics                 
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Karin Shankar, MAIN 302; W (2–4:50 PM)        
3 credits

Through film, dramatic texts, performance, visual art, and theory, this course will explore the legacies of colonialism, as well as the sites of exclusion and exploitation created by global capital today. We will ask how aesthetic tools may challenge binary systems of value (First World/Third World, developed/underdeveloped, center/periphery) and allow for the emergence of art and politics of “borderlands” and “in-between worlds.” We will begin by delving into the discourses, film and performance works of prominent artists (circa 1960s-1990s) of independent nations of Asia and Africa to understand the distinguishing characteristics of postcolonial aesthetic praxis (canonical counter-discourses, non-linear temporality, carnival logics, and various “languages” of resistance—hybridity, folklore, silence, rhythm etc.) We will also study the relationships between art and memory following years of sustained political violence and dictatorship in Latin America. Then

we will turn our attention to more recent performance works from within the United States that engage with contemporary global politics and aesthetics of "home," sovereignty, surveillance, and borders.

HMS-431S – Staging, Space, and the City                      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01 – Professor Christoph Kumpusch, Main 302; T (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

This course is an experimental and research oriented study of space and performance space. The goal of the course is to explore new aspects of architectural thought and practice as it relates to performing and performance architecture.  We will study basic techniques of performance and architecture and will invent new ones.  We will remove conventional limits, understanding reality and projecting fantasy. We will not only design performing elements, but explore the design of systems, provocative visions of possible realities

HMS-431S – Fashion, Labor, and Justice           
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

02 – Professor Minh-Ha Pham, DEK 006; W (9–11:50 AM)
3 credits

This course offers an overview of the political economy of the fashion industry from about the 1980s to the present. Focusing on specific examples of transnational supply chains, we follow the globalized production and consumption of garments and brands, and examine closely the debates about gender and globalization, economic and social development, labor standards, sustainability and activism. Some of the questions we will explore include: How do we account for the globalization of the garment industry? What are the politics of today's global “fast fashion” industry both in the global South and in the North? Do alternatives such as "ethical fashion" or "slow fashion" initiatives by designers, programs for corporate social responsibility, and campaigns of consumer activism offer meaningful interventions? What role do workers in the fashion industry—from garment workers to retail workers to models to bloggers—play in shaping discussions about a more just and sustainable future for fashion? We draw from interdisciplinary scholarship ranging from anthropology and sociology to media studies and race and ethnic studies.                             

HMS 431S – Magic, Art, Religion, and Science             
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

03—Professor Ira Livingston, ENGR 115; M (9–11:50 AM)       
3 credits

In this course, we will explore how magic, religion, science and art differ as practices and as belief systems, how they interact with each other-- and most importantly, the resonances, intersections, points of contact and hybrid formations that are possible among them.  The course will involve readings in all these areas, some short writings, and a final project in which students will be invited to invent their own religions.                                                                               

HMS 431S – Writing about Art and Culture                 
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

05—Professor Minh-Ha Pham, DEK 010; Th (9:30 AM–12:20 PM)
3 credits

Today, everyone has a “hot take”—a piece of commentary that responds quickly to the latest political, cultural, or social event. It competes for public attention in a 24-hour news cycle where journalists, bloggers, and other commentators (amateur and professional) are vying for the public’s increasingly divided attention. Because of this, “hot takes” are often disparaged (sometimes deservedly) for substituting a personal opinion and shallow moralizing for thoughtful, deliberate criticism. This course focuses on “the cool take”—commentary that is timely but not hastily produced, based on individual perspectives as well as research and data. 

In this course, students will learn to identify what constitutes compelling arts writing and criticism, and employ those same standards while producing their own cultural criticism. Choosing their own medium and/or media, students will practice writing/performing pieces of criticism that put an exhibition, concert, television episode/series, theatrical production, fashion collection, food trend, or some other cultural production in greater historical, social, political, and/or cultural context. Throughout the semester, students will turn in drafts of their work and receive constructive feedback from the professor and their peers. In addition, we will read, watch, and listen to professional cultural commentators and discuss the ways in which a written review, a podcast, or a vlog is or isn’t successful. This writing intensive course will improve students’ writing, research, and thinking skills through the necessary art of rewriting.

HMS-432S – A Queer Sensorium             
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Jayna Brown, NH 307; Tu (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits

Through speculative fiction, queer ecologies, new materialism, performance art and qqueer of color critique, this course refuses the dominant binaries we live under in our heteronormative world:  thinking/feeling, man/woman, reason/emotion, human/animal, human/nature, work/pleasure.  As well as melting the boundaries between these, this class focuses on destabilizing the hierarchy of the senses, which situates thinking above feeling and vision as the foremost sense.  Instead, we focus on the sense of touch, sound, smell and other perceptions, as well as on the full range of the senses felt together.  Such embodied knowledge allows for alternative ontologies to arise, and different ways of feeling ourselves and others, enmeshed in wider ecologies.

HMS-434S – Studies of Racialized Capitalism              
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Jon Beller, Dek 010; Th (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits

This seminar investigates cultural practices, technical forms, art, film, writing, poetry, social movements and critical theory in manners useful to the practical critique of racial capitalism. By necessity the course engages histories of enslavement, racialization, sex-gender normativity, settler colonialism, imperialism, globalization, financialization and contemporary media formations including "social media," surveillance technologies, and computation. Materials include films, poetry, literature and critical theory.

HMS 440B – Cinema and the City           

Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Paul Haacke, NH 106; Th (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits        

What is the relationship between the rise of the modern city and the development of cinema? How has the rapid transformation of cityscapes affected the cinematic imagination of screen space, and vice versa? In this course, we will explore not only how narrative films and other forms of cinematic media have represented urban life and architecture, but also how urbanization has shaped the history of cinema, and how film industries have transformed metropolitan areas and the environments around them. While studying major movements and genres of film history from different parts of the world (e.g. “city symphony” films, crime and film noir, science fiction, neorealism, independent and avant-garde cinema, etc.), we will also read theoretical and critical texts by cinema and media scholars, architects, sociologists, and philosophers. Topics for discussion will include relations between documentary and fantasy, mobility and subjection, rhythm and mood, and the local and global as well as pressing concerns about class and capital, racial and cultural recognition, gender and sexuality, and political ecology.                                                                                                                                   

HMS 440S – Deleuze, Cinema and Time            
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

02—Professor Chris Vitale, ENGR 309; W (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits

This course will provide a survey of one of the most influential film philosophies ever created, Gilles Deleuze’s monumental two-volume Cinema 1: The Movement-Image, and Cinema 2: The Time-Image.  In the process of learning to see the world anew with Deleuze, students will gain an overview of film history with Deleuze as guide.  Special attention will be paid to Deleuze’s theories of cinematic time, cinema as ‘time machine,’ his notion that ‘the brain is the screen,’ and his concepts of the time-image and movement image.  No prerequisites other than willingness to read some difficult texts and see some amazing films. 

HMS-440S – Culture Jamming/Media Activism           
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

04 – Professor Minh-Ha Pham, DEK 010, W (12:30–3:20 PM)
3 credits

This course provides a scholarly and hands-on exploration of a form of anti-commercial media activism called “culture jamming.” In the classroom, we will survey the history and politics of culture jamming in its many forms including ad busting, media stunts/hoaxes, billboard banditry, parody websites, and on-line viral campaigns. We will consider, in particular, the potential and limits of culture jamming as a means of creating social change in relation to racism, sexism, classism, labor exploitation, etc. Outside class, working individually or in small teams, and armed with a “toolbox” of creative tactics and techniques discussed in class, students will design and implement their own culture jams. Throughout the semester, students will have opportunities to workshop their culture jams with their classmates.

Case studies will be drawn from Adbusters, Reverend Billy and the Church of Stop Shopping, Billionaires for Bush, The Yes Men, Guerrilla Girls, Jonah Peretti’s Nike/Sweatshop stunt, Kristina Wong’s mock mail-order bride site BigBadChineseMama.com, Mendi + Keith Obadike’s eBay auction/action “Blackness for Sale,” and damali ayo’s website rent-a-negro.com, etc. Selected readings from Mark Dery, Naomi Klein, Rosemary Coombe and Andrew Herman, and others will provide background in the history, theory, and methods of anti-commercial media activism.

HMS 441A – Global Cinema                      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

02—Professor Chris Vitale, ENGR 309; T (5–8 PM)  
3 credits

In this course, we will explore visions of iconic contemporary filmmakers from global cinema notable for their innovative cinematic representation of modern life. Through their works, selected for their capability to go beyond national and cultural boundaries, we will examine how the invention of new cinematic language is used evoke poignant insight into human experience, and potentially bear influence on our perceptions of reality. In modules organized by genres, we will develop methods of analysis through in-depth formal and thematic study of several films, extend our investigation in small research projects by students, and based on these studies and integrate theory with practice in applied creative workshops. A guest filmmaker may be invited to hold a post-screening master class with students. Advance viewing of films is expected. Requirements include a midterm essay project and a final creative or theoretical project based on the films from the course.

HMS-460S – Race, Media, Performance             
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Jayna Brown, MAIN 302; Th (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

This course explores the way ideas of race, gender, and sexuality, as intertwined concepts, are produced and performed through live performance, film, video, recording and various internet incarnations. We consider the circulation of images, ideas, memes and iconographica in historical perspective, from early film, documentary to on line content. We consider these media not only as formations through which dominant cultures reinforce oppressive systems and structures of feeling, but also as formations through which racialized and gendered subjects contest these ideas. 

Our discussions will kick up many questions, including: What are the politics of media circulation? What are the limits of a discourse of representation? To what ends do we seek such representation? What does visibility mean for people of color? What is spectacularizing and what is witnessing? Should certain images circulate at all? Is there such a thing as a public/private divide? Is it always about visuality—do we assume it to be the legitimating medium? What is possible in other sensual realms (aural, haptic?)

HMS-460S – Walkscapes: (Re)mapping a City             
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

02—Professor Jeffrey Hogrefe, NH 209; T (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

The course focus is on New York City as a potential site of hospitality; which, can be observed, recorded, analyzed and reimagined through material practices in mapping. To assist us to appropriate the city on an experiential level, we will perform several different types of walking methodologies that will enable us to record bodily sensations, to collect anecdotal data, to visualize and verbalize spatial concepts and to conceive of interventions that promote hospitality. We will practice together as a class a genealogy of artist and writer’s walking practices from the historic avant-garde. In order that we may see that the relationship between human behavior and the city is dynamic, the concept of time and the manifestation of the past, present and future will inform our investigations and interventions.

HMS-460S – Deep Listening                     
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

03—Professor Julia Steinmetz, NH 210; M (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits

Originally developed by composer Pauline Oliveros, Deep Listening is a practice of “listening in every possible way to everything possible to hear no matter what one is doing.” This practice leads to an extended consideration of the involuntary process of hearing contrasted with the voluntary, selective act of listening. How do we perform listening? What is the performativity of the act of listening? This course will engage practices of sonic meditation, interactive performance, listening to the sounds of daily life (nature, one’s own thoughts, dreams) and listening to listening itself. In parallel, we will explore theories of listening emerging from music, psychoanalysis, and sound studies and apply Deep Listening as a Performance Studies methodology.

HMS-460S – Creative Practices in Afrosurrealism                 
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

05—Professor Jeffrey Hogrefe, DEK 006; Th (9:30 AM–12:20 PM)
3 credits

Afrosurrealism is a creative practice that spans across time and space for transformations in real lived experience. Through critical reading, writing and interpretive walking practices, the creative practices in Afrosurrealism presented in this class will introduce students to ways to reorder the events and objects of the everyday landscape and language for an alternative to the present. This theory praxis class will operate as a community that gathers collective and individual impressions in the landscape and language of Brooklyn for shared and individual projects. Customizable to accommodate individual approaches, for a final project each student will produce a twelve-page paper with additional media. 

HMS 490A – Electro-Acoustic Music                 
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Chris Vitale, MACH 107; W (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

This course will teach students how to create and record their own electronic music/sound projects in a recording studio environment. Assuming no prior knowledge of any sort, the course will center on a hands-on exploration of the tools needed for students to create their own electronic music/sound compositions, supplementing this with the basic physics of sound, music theory, songwriting tools, history of electronic music, and various contemporary online resources as helpful. Students will learn how to create their own sounds on various types of hardware and software synthesizers (analog subtractive, FM, granular, wavetable, modular, sampling, etc.), how to process sounds using various effects (eq, compression, reverb, delay, mod fx, distortions, etc.), basics of audio production (field recorders, monitors, mic placement, room treatment), recording and mixing in DAWs (digital audio workstation software platforms, Logic/Ableton), and how to use other tools (MIDI/CV, sequencers, arpeggiators) to organize compositions, including for live performance. Mid-term and final projects will be based around students recording/performing their own compositions, with a goal that students leave the course with the tools to be able to grow their own electronic music/sound practices on their own.

HMS 491A – The Artist's Book                
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Adeena Karaick, Engr 309; M (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

This course develops critical frameworks for interpreting and creating artists' books; that is, artworks in which the book is a medium. We will study such books alongside histories of the field, theoretical writings, and critical commentaries. These studies will inform our endeavors to create, catalogue, and/or critique artists' books in which visual, verbal, and material elements are interwoven. Advanced students from various fields are encouraged to use and expand their own disciplinary perspectives. Visits to collections around New York City will supplement Pratt's resources.                                                                             

HMS 492A – Animating Narrative                      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Ellery Washington, NH 303; W (2–4:50 PM)
3 credits

With an eye towards short animation, Animating Narrative focuses on the fundamentals of storytelling and how to employ strong narrative elements in visual work. While analyzing and deconstructing archetypal narrative forms, from classical mythologies to modern stories and post-modern hyperrealist tendencies, students will write and workshop their own stories, emphasizing how these stories might translate to a concise visual format.

HMS 496A – Creative Writing for Art and Design Practice    
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—TBA, ENGR 117; M (10–11:50 AM)
02—TBA, NH 106; M (2–3:50 PM)
03—TBA, NH 303; T (2–3:50 PM)
04—TBA, NH 211; T (2–3:50 PM)
05—TBA, NH 106; W (2–3:50 PM)
06—TBA, NH 108; W (2–3:50 PM)
07—TBA, NH 116; W (2–3:50 PM)
1 credit

This course is a one-credit writing workshop designed to support artistic and design practice and provide students with creative approaches to meet writing required of them in school and more generally. Students will read and write about visual art, design, dance, money, news and politics, science, poetry. They will also write first person essays and collaborative texts about their own practice of making. Students will complete weekly assignments and cooperatively review work in class. Students will be given the opportunity to publish their work on a class blog or print anthology. For a final assignment, students will prepare a writing portfolio and present a revised artists statement.           

HMS 499 – Poetics Lab                  
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Ira Livingston, MAIN 402; W (9–11:50 AM)        
03—Professor Duncan Hamilton, MAIN 301; W (9–11:50 AM)
3 credits

Poetics Lab is a 3-credit seminar, play-space and transdisciplinary think-tank involving faculty and students (undergrad and grad) from across the Institute. We will be exploring the topic of PLAY; experimenting, thinking and creating together on a range of relevant problems and provocations, as determined by our mutual interests. Topics may include play as a design and writing process, digital play and gaming, improvisation, performance, theories of play, and others. Admission to the class is by application; students will receive the Poetics Lab Fellowship, allowing them to draw on a special $10,000 fund for project expenses and resources.

To apply for admission, contact Poetics Lab Director Ira Livingston at livings@pratt.edu; please include (1) your name, major, class year, email, student number, (2) a very short statement as to how PLAY as a creative process—and/or how interdisciplinary or collaborative processes—relate to your own work, and (3), if you wish, any ideas you might have for collaborative projects that relate to the topic at hand. These might be spur-of-the-moment ideas or things you've been dreaming of doing for a long time, and we welcome ideas that might be experimental, serious, whimsical, absurdist, defiant, activist, epic and impossible, small and easy, etc.

Humanities and Media Studies – Foreign Languages


CHI 103 – Elementary Chinese II            
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Echo Sun, NH 116; MW (6:30–7:50 PM)
3 credits

This is a course in conversational Chinese (Mandarin), including basic grammar and vocabulary, along with aspects of Chinese culture. In addition to learning to speak Chinese, students will learn Hanyu Pinyin, a Romanized pronunciation system to aid Chinese learning, and will learn to recognize and write 200-300 Chinese characters.

FREN 102 – Intro to French II     

Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor TBA, MAIN 302; MW (9:30–10:50 AM)
3 credits

This course focuses equally on oral comprehension and speaking, reading, and written expression. Vocabulary is presented thematically in the context of everyday life in France. Students will develop writing skills and will enjoy French songs, poems, and readings on cultural topics. A feature-length French film will complete this introduction.              

FREN 202 – Intermediate French II                   
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor TBA, MAIN 302; MW (11 AM–12:20 PM)
3 credits

After completion of FREN 101-102, or contact the HMS department.

ITAL 102 – Italian II                      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Barbara Turoff, ENGR 309; MW (9:30–10:50 AM) 
02—Professor Barbara Turoff, ENGR 309; MW (11 AM–12:20 PM)
3 credits

This course continues the first semester of Italian given at Pratt's Brooklyn campus. The course is designed to give ITAL-101 first semester beginners a good working knowledge of both written and spoken Italian. Conversational skills are stressed.       

SPAN 201 – Introduction to Spanish I                
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Alba Potes, NH 108; Th (12:30– 3:30 PM)
3 credits

The goal of this course is to learn communication skills in Spanish, which include conversation with others, the expression of ideas in writing, and reading. The course will also focus on learning vocabulary related to art-and-design.          

ITAL 202 – Intermediate Italian II                      
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Barbara Turoff, ENGR 305; MW (2–3:20 PM)    
3 credits

Students will achieve an intermediate level competency in the language skills of writing, reading comprehension, speaking and oral comprehension, and to gain an understanding of aspects of Italian culture such as regional distinctions, cuisines, politics, cinema, music, art and literature.

SPAN 202 – Introduction to Spanish II              
Gen Ed Post-Core Elective

01—Professor Alba Potes, NH 113; T (5–7:50 PM)
3 credits                                                                                                                                

The course is the continuation of introduction to Spanish I (either SPAN-201 or SPAN-501). The goal of this course is to learn communication skills in Spanish, which include conversation with others, the expression of ideas in writing, and reading. The course will also focus on learning vocabulary related to art and design.                          

SPAN  501 – Conversational Spanish I (Restricted to ADE students)

01 & 02—Professor Alba Potes, NH 108; Th (12:30–3:30 PM) 
3 credits

This is a conversational Spanish course designed to prepare Art and Design Education majors (undergraduate and graduate) for the practicum in New York City schools. Conversational exercises will be oriented to classroom interactions.  (Open only to students in Art and Design Education.)