Summer 2021 – Humanities and Media Studies Courses

HMS-101A-03: Literary and Critical Studies I

Summer Term I / Online / GenEd Core Required Course
Professor Adeena Karasick; T, Th, 2pm-4:20pm

3 credits

This class serves as an introduction to reading and writing about literary texts and critical theory, with a concentration on composition, critical analysis, and research. Students are required to write essays based on the critical analysis of texts across a range of genres. Emphasis is placed on using writing as an extension of the thought and creative process, and as a tool that can be integrated across academic and artistic disciplines. There will be a focus on mastering the elements of the thesis-centered essay and developing research skills.

HMS-201A: Literary and Critical Studies II

Summer Term I / Online / GenEd Core Required Course
Section 01—Professor Cecilia Muhlstein; M, W, 5p-7:20pm
Section 02—Professor Kathryn Cullen-DuPont; M, W, 2pm-4:20pm
Section 03—Professor Evan Rehill; T, Th, 5pm-7:20pm

3 credits

While students continue to deepen and refine the critical thinking and writing skills required in 101A, emphasis is places on exploring literary and visual texts in historical and cultural contexts and in their myriad relations to critical theory. Students will also continue to develop and refine a writing style characterized by coherency, clarity of expression, analytical rigor, and personal style. The course will culminate in an independent research project that helps to point students toward their further focused studies.

HMS-232A-01: Horror and Monstrosity

Summer Term II / Online / GenEd Post-Core Elective
Professor Saul Anton; M, W, Th, 12pm-2:50pm

3 credits

This course will serve as a general introduction to the issues of horror, monstrosity, and the abject in literature, film, and theory. Topics may include: the uncanny, the fantastic, catharsis, the sublime, the gaze, liminality, trauma, return of the repressed, projection, splitting, Freud's analysis of dreams, the gothic, etc. Materials will include historical materials, literary texts by authors such as Hoffman, Kafka, Gilman, etc., and films by Wiener, Hitchcock, Powell, Romero, Polansky, Argento, Barker, Scott, Jeunet, Gans, Park, etc. Specific texts and films may vary.

HMS-262A-01: Introduction to Acting

Summer Term II / Online / GenEd Post-Core Elective
Professor Don Andraeson; M, W, Th, 10am-12:50pm

3 credits 

This class enables students to develop fundamental acting skills including voice, movement, expression, imagination, character development, trust and relaxation.

HMS-300B-01: The Literature of Popular Culture

Summer Term II / Online / GenEd Post-Core Elective
Professor Sacha Frey; M, W, Th, 9am-11:50am

3 credits 

This course investigates how works of the 20th Century literary sub-genres of science, western, romance, horror and detective fiction reflect in their familiar stylistic conventions popular national myths, gender stereotypes and other prevailing social and political perspectives.

HMS-312: Future Worlds & Science Fiction

Summer Term II / Online / GenEd Post-Core Elective
Professor Jayna Brown; M, W, Th, 9:30am - 12:20pm

3 credits 

Science fiction disorients us, unsettling our common sense notions of selfhood, nature, and progress; it can destabilize what we think we know about being human and about life itself. This course examines science fiction literature, film, and other media through the rubric of science studies, with three overlapping areas of exploration: biology, technology, and broader planetary ecologies. Though the focus of the course will be fiction, film, and media, we will use theories coming out of science studies and science fiction studies to analyze the course materials.

HMS-440E: Poetics of Cinema

Summer Term II / Online / GenEd Post-Core Elective
Section 01: Professor Amy Guggenheim; M, W, Th 12:00pm-2:50pm
Section 02: Professor Amy Guggenheim; M 4-8:50pm, W 4-6:20pm

3 credits 

This course investigates relationships between image and narrative in cinema. Weekly creative assignments—informed by close readings of film excerpts and text—will culminate in the design of a short, poetic film project. We will view visionary work by innovative filmmakers, and engage in close reading, followed by active discussion, to deepen our understanding of artistic choices-- in the use of metaphor, point of view, association, montage, image/action, frame, composition, time, space, kinetics, transformation, multiple perspectives, reflexivity, gesture and the body, non-linear narrative, amongst others—in the act of visual storytelling central to the cinematic enterprise.

HMS-460S-01: Deep Listening

Summer Term II / Online / GenEd Post-Core Elective
Professor Julia Steinmetz; M, W, F, 9am-11:50am

3 credits

Originally developed by composer Pauline Oliveros, Deep Listening is a practice of “listening in every possible way to everything possible to hear no matter what one is doing.” This practice leads to an extended consideration of the involuntary process of hearing contrasted with the voluntary, selective act of listening. How do we perform listening? What is the performativity of the act of listening? This course will engage practices of sonic meditation, interactive performance, listening to the sounds of daily life (nature, one’s own thoughts, dreams) and listening to listening itself. In parallel, we will explore theories of listening emerging from music, psychoanalysis, and sound studies and apply Deep Listening as a Performance Studies methodology.