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Working with distinguished writers who are Pratt faculty members, explore unique topics to grow your writing practice. Enjoy opportunities to connect with peers, receive mentorship and participate in public readings.

1st CHAPTERS: START YOUR NOVEL
PMW-904

Have you always wanted to write a novel? Every book has to hook the reader within the first few pages. How do you get a strong story rolling? How do you establish the characters and their world without slowing things down? We’ll take a look at a number of different opening gambits through reading excellent first chapters from published authors. Students will write opening chapters of their own and get detailed feedback. We’ll also discuss strategies for how to push on and finish a whole novel.

About the instructor: Gabriel Cohen is the author of five novels and a nonfiction book, and was a finalist for an Edgar Award. He has written for the New York TimesPoets & WritersTimeOut New York, Gourmet. com, and many other publications. Now in his tenth year at Pratt, he is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Writing Program, and has also taught writing at New York University, the Center for Fiction, and Long Island University; worked as a staff writer at the New Haven Advocate weekly newspaper; and was a guest lecturer aboard the Queen Mary 2 ocean liner.

WEDNESDAYS | GABRIEL COHEN
OCT 2-DEC 11| 6:30-9:30 PM
10 SESSIONS | 3 CEUs | $795
PRATT MANHATTAN CENTER

SURROUNDING THE GHOST
PMW-902

A generative practice perceiving meaningful patterns in random data, Apophenia is the mind’s desire to make connections between unrelated events. How can we use this idea to write what is unwritable? When stories are full of holes or faulty memories, trauma or the world’s unknowable wonder, this practice can sketch an outline/chalkline around the invisible, creating a pointillist narrative that is vibrant with synaptic leaps and air-borne connections. We’ll spend class time discussing a handful of readings and ideas while we work on creating both written and oral narratives. 

SATURDAY | SAMANTHA HUNT
NOV 9 | 10AM-3PM
1 SESSION | .4 CEUs | $150
BROOKLYN CAMPUS

WOMEN’S NARRATIVES
PMW-901

This course will look at examples of women’s writing in different genres and guide students to try their own hand in these genres. We will look at works of journalism, poetry, fiction, travel writing, personal essays, graphic novels, hybrid and experimental forms, as well as theoretical and critical texts. The course aims to introduce writers to a variety of female writers and their approaches, guiding them to find what works best for them to give voice to their own narratives.

MONDAYS | POUPEH MISSAGHI
OCT 7-DEC 30| 6:30-9:30 PM
(Skip Columbus Day, Veterans Day and Hannukah)
10 SESSIONS | 3 CEUs | $795
BROOKLYN CAMPUS

THE POETICS OF LOVE

PMW-903

“I dread falling in love,” wrote the poet Robert Duncan. “Falling in love means losing my being. Love exposes us to the first body and to the light; we might even fall in love with what we hate or what hates us.” The Poetics of Love seeks to engage the transformative potential of love and emotional interdependence—from eros to philia, philautia to agape—while simultaneously considering attachment’s affective underbellies: fear, anxiety, hatred. As we seek to understand our collective social consciousness around love, we will construct new metaphors of it that undermine heteropatriarchy, female subjugation, and interpersonal and systemic violence. By the end of the course, students will produce a portfolio of writing.

SUNDAYS |CLAIRE DONATO
OCT 20-NOV 17 | 5-8 PM
6 SESSIONS |2.7 CEUs | $495
BROOKLYN CAMPUS