Our on-going experiment in robotic fabrication of curved surfaces is continuing with the intention of scaling up to building components. We show three examples. A 5-axis robot has been retrofitted with a small router to enable and extend our ability to physically explore minimal surface geometries. These continuously curved forms can be broken into fabricable parts which when assembled visually dissolve the construction logic to build a seamless surface as shown with Fischer-Koch S surface (1-3) or two of Schoen’s S surfaces (4-6). These physical experiments demonstrate that larger aggregates can be constructed and 3D-printed to study them. Our objective is to explore how these milled forms can become molds for using new materials (currently, carbon fiber) and develop new structural systems.

Students: Seung-Hoon Lee, Robinson Strong, Daniel Rodriguez


Haresh Lalvani / John Gulliford
Haresh Lalvani / John Gulliford
Haresh Lalvani / John Gulliford
Haresh Lalvani / John Gulliford
Haresh Lalvani / John Gulliford
Haresh Lalvani / John Gulliford