TEACHING PARTICIPATORY PRACTICE AS THE BEST WAY TO ADVOCATE FOR JUST, EQUITABLE COMMUNITIES

The Historic Preservation program prepares students for leadership within a continuously changing preservation context. With a broad grasp of cultural heritage issues, law, policy, and practice coupled with documentation, evaluation, communication, and interpretative skills, the program’s scholars are prepared with the essential practical and professional tools of the field. Case studies and interaction with community leaders and practitioners insures an integrative, interdisciplinary, and inclusive approach. The New York City environment, its urban context, and an accomplished faculty support the goal of excellence and national recognition in the field.

 
 

PRATT HISTORIC PRESERVATION ORGANIZATION

The Pratt Historic Preservation Organization (PHPO) is a student-led educational, inter-departmental organization dedicated to the advancement of the preservation field and related areas of study through activities that include volunteering, advocacy, community outreach, extracurricular scholarship, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Pratt’s Historic Preservation department and PHPO share a goal to contribute to the School of Architecture and Pratt Institute as a whole, creating partnerships of opportunity, understanding, and advancement across all disciplines. PHPO membership is automatic for all students at Pratt Institute who are enrolled in the Historic Preservation program

Pratt Historic Preservation Organization Members In addition to supporting site visits as part of course curricula, PHPO works to ensure Pratt’s HP students are presented with exciting travel opportunities. During the 2014-15 school year, students traveled to Rome under the supervision of one of our History of Architecture professors, an art and architectural historian specializing in Greek and Roman archaeology and architecture. Upon arrival, students participated in a guided tour of the Theater of Marcellus in the “Field of Mars,” and then enjoyed an exclusive visit to the Temple of Portunus, an ancient Roman temple that was converted into a Medieval church. The week of tours was capped by a visit to the Testaccio neighborhood, where students discussed and explored Rome after 1870 and the urban influences of the city’s development as the capital of Italy.